Dianabol Cycle Information and Examples

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Dianabol Cycle

- Cycle example: 10 week dbol cycle with 5mg tabs:
The total amount of tabs would be 492. This would be exact to the last. It would be best to take the tabs in three sections throughout the day, not so hard on the system. The cycle period should be 10 weeks. This is a classic pyramid scheme where you would start with 4 tabs daily, increase to 10 tabs daily until the 5th week and then decrease back to 4 tabs. Look at the cycle chart:

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Tabs
Week 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 29
Week 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 37
Week 3 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 49
Week 4 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 61
Week 5 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 70
Week 6 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 70
Week 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 61
Week 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 49
Week 9 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 37
Week 10 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 29


After this cycle, it would be best to take at least 4 weeks off and give the body a rest from the gear. Many actually keep on throughout the year, however this is not recommended, or at least wasn't until the intervention of such wonders as the oral called Clenbuterol came along. Clenbuterol is used during the off period and has been proven to be able to not only maintain the size gained during previous stacks, but to also induce further gains and promote better muscle condition to boot.

Cycle is actually the duration of the use of the anabolic steroids. It is a cycle because due to the hepatic effects of dianabol, the drug is not used continuously for a long period of time but for a certain period followed by a break of about the same period. The break should preferably be even longer. For example for a 6 week use of dbol, a break of about 10 weeks should be taken. The Dianabol Cycle also includes the sequence and time span of using dianabol with other drugs which are also anabolic steroids but are longer acting.

Dbol is used to set the whole cycle into action. This is so because it is a fast acting substance. When it is used, the effects start to show relatively quickly, even within a few days. After a certain period of time, dianabol use is reduced as the effects of the other longer acting drugs being used in conjunction with it start to emerge.

The whole mass cycle looks like:


Cycle Diagram


The Dianabol Mass Cycle

The longer acting anabolic steroids used in the steroid cycles are usually injectables and long-lasting drugs. Some of the commonly used long-acting anabolics used for this purpose are Deca, dianabol, equipoise and testosterone ethanate.

Any person starting a dbol cycle should take from about 25-50 mg of dianabol per day. They should continue this for about three to six weeks as they start the cycle. Usually the maximum effects surface in 4 weeks, or rather the cycle ‘Kick starts’ during this time period. The use of dianabol should be stopped as the other injectable drugs start to show results.

It is very important to bridge between successive cycles. This bridging time should allow for the body to regain its natural hormonal balance before anabolic steroid use is resumed. This period includes using a very low quantity of dianabol, like about 10 mg per day. Along with this PCT (Post Cycle Therapy) should also be administered which includes the use of drugs like Nolvadrex, Clomid and HCG. These help to boost natural testosterone production.

Combining dbol use with other steroids is also referred to as stacking. It is very important that users stack the steroids under the direct observation of a physician who should also regularly monitor the health of the users to make sure no side effects occur, especially those related to hepatic toxicity.

Dianabol cycles are less commonly employed and usually the term is used to refer to use of dbol in stack with other anabolic drugs. The reason only dbol is not used is because a very large amount of it would be required to gain the same benefits. Such large doses may cause considerable harm to the liver.


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